Older adults often say they want to stay in their own homes as long as they can. We describe such thinking as aging in place — defined as living in the home and community of your choice as you age. It is a place where one feels safe has the ability to control and enjoy life experiences.

An important role for the Church in its ministry by, with, and for older adults is helping older adults age in faith. In other words, effective congregational ministries intentionally invite, nurture, and equip older adults to age faithfully!

On my desk is a small, unframed piece of paper. While the edges are frayed and the once-white paper is yellowing, it provides an important focus for living my days. It reminds me of who I am and what I hope to become.

Sooner or later, everyone endures bereavement — the experience of the death of a loved one. Our emotional response to bereavement is grief, a personal experience whose duration and depth can vary from individual to individual. Some people recover quickly from a loss and move on. Other people grieve intensely for a short period before finding peace while other individuals feel profound grief for years.

As a child, I had freckles on my nose and cheeks. My body was not covered in freckles like some of my childhood friends, but I didn’t like that I had freckles anywhere on my body. My distain for my freckles was well known to my family.

While retirement has changes and challenges, it also provides opportunities to embark on new adventures. ENCORE Ministry Director Rev. Dr. Richard Gentzler provides an inspiring and alternative view of retirement.

Every May, The United Methodist Church invites local churches to celebrate Older Adult Recognition Day during Older Americans Month (OAM). Church leaders are invited to provide opportunities during May — whether on a Sunday morning during worship or on other days and times — for recognizing the legacy, unique gifts, and challenges of older adults. The 2022 theme is Age …

When I was a child, I used to imagine what it would be like to be as old as my great-grandfather, Sterling Grim. My great-grandfather was a Pennsylvania Dutchman and an active member of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ. He sometimes spoke in German or Pennsylvania Dutch and tried teaching me the language. I had enough difficulty with the English language and could never quite grasp his German tongue. For some reason, his thick white hair and wrinkled face never frightened me. In fact, I was attracted to my great-grandfather because I felt special by his love.

Caregiving can be both an opportunity and a burden. It’s often a long journey with no end in sight. Few people face more daily challenges or overcome more obstacles than caregivers. During the COVID pandemic, the challenges of caregiving have been exacerbated for many who receive care and those who provide it.